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ATABKAM Professional Services

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Seven Jobs That AI Could Replace by 2030

Posted on December 14, 2019 at 9:09 PM Comments comments (0)

  
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In a recent speech, Forrester vice president and principal consultant Huard Smith said that the human aspect of many professions would be “all gone” by 2030 due to advances in AI and ML technology.

In this piece, I’ll look at seven of the industries or positions that are currently most likely to decline over the next decade. Believe me; number seven will surprise you.

1. Telemarketers
The chances of this particular role becoming fully computerized are as high as 99.9%. This is mainly because telemarketing conversion rates are relatively low. Also, there is an expected 4% reduction in career growth expectancy across this industry over the next few years.,,

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Bjarne Stroustrup: C++ | Artificial Intelligence (AI) Podcast

Posted on November 7, 2019 at 9:45 PM Comments comments (0)

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What Is Federated Learning?

Posted on October 15, 2019 at 11:27 PM Comments comments (0)

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The key to becoming a medical specialist, in any discipline, is experience.

Knowing how to interpret symptoms, which move to make next in critical situations, and which treatment to provide — it all comes down to the training you’ve had and the opportunities you’ve had to apply it.

For AI algorithms, experience comes in the form of large, varied, high-quality datasets. But such datasets have traditionally proved hard to come by, especially in the area of healthcare.

Medical institutions have had to rely on their own data sources, which can be biased by, for example, patient demographics, the instruments used or clinical specializations. Or they’ve needed to pool data from other institutions to gather all of the information they need.

Federated learning makes it possible for AI algorithms to gain experience from a vast range of data located at different sites.

The approach enables several organizations to collaborate on the development of models, but without needing to directly share sensitive clinical data with each other.

Over the course of several training iterations the shared models get exposed to a significantly wider range of data than what any single organization possesses in-house...
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How AI will transform healthcare (and can it fix the US healthcare system?)

Posted on October 15, 2019 at 9:42 PM Comments comments (0)



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For those who are new to AI, Machine Learning, and Deep Learning, I recommend taking a look at the following article entitled "An Introduction to AI." I will refer to Machine Learning and Deep Learning as being subsets of AI. Furthermore, this article is non-exhaustive in relation to potential applications of AI to healthcare and Quantum Computing to various sectors of the economy.
The reason for the focus on AI in healthcare is in light of recent articles by a few senior medical practitioners in the US expressing concern about the role of AI in healthcare.
Some of the concerns expressed, such as the need for improved sharing of data by healthcare participants including hospitals and ensuring the highest quality in the preparation of data, are entirely valid and I take the view that the need for access to data and sharing of data by hospitals may need to become a matter of political and regulatory concern. In addition, careful evaluation of ground truth for data labelling, testing, and validation of models needs to be ensured across all AI companies offering services across healthcare.
However, I remain of the view that AI and in particular Deep Learning technology will have a major role to play in healthcare in the 2020s...
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Yann LeCun: Deep Learning, Convolutional Neural Networks, and Self-Supervised Learning | AI Podcast

Posted on September 21, 2019 at 5:04 PM Comments comments (0)

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How to beat facial recognition systems with Face Anonymization

Posted on September 21, 2019 at 1:32 PM Comments comments (0)


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The year 2019 has shown itself to be unprecedented for consumer privacy concerns, and there are no signs of this trend slowing down. Via a number of avenues, such as Netflix’s new series ‘The Great Hack’, consumers are being exposed to a suffocating reality, that the idea of privacy is quickly vanishing.

There have been various natural responses to this growing concern, one of which is the introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR for short. This new regulation aims to empower consumers (EU Citizens and Businesses), to retain more control as to how, where, and to whom their data is distributed. The regulation is built around consumer consent, aiming to bring back control to the individuals or businesses, while regulating the activities of larger organizations.

While initiatives such as GDPR have certainly moved the power imbalance slightly back towards the individual, the fact remains that it's practical/active use-cases for the individual are harder to quantify.........
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The case for optimism on climate change

Posted on September 1, 2019 at 11:39 AM Comments comments (0)
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Machine Learning Is The Future Of Cancer Prediction

Posted on September 1, 2019 at 11:04 AM Comments comments (0)


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Every year, Pathologists diagnose 14 million new patients with cancer around the world. That’s millions of people who’ll face years of uncertainty.
Pathologists have been performing cancer diagnoses and prognoses for decades. Most pathologists have a 96–98% success rate for diagnosing cancer. They’re pretty good at that part.
The problem comes in the next part. According to the Oslo University Hospital, the accuracy of prognoses is only 60% for pathologists. A prognosis is the part of a biopsy that comes after cancer has been diagnosed, it is predicting the development of the disease.
It’s time for the next step to be taken in pathology.
Introducing Machine Learning....
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How is machine learning affecting genetic testing?

Posted on January 20, 2019 at 11:02 PM Comments comments (0)
 
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Machine learning is being applied to genetic testing in many different ways.
The applications are nearly endless. Machine learning is helping scientists to analyze DNA, decode the human genome, assess disease phenotypes, understand gene expression, and even participate in a process called gene editing, where DNA is actually “spliced” into an organism’s genetic code...
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While We Sleep, Our Mind Goes on an Amazing Journey

Posted on December 26, 2018 at 4:33 PM Comments comments (0)


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Nearly every night of our lives, we undergo a startling metamorphosis.

Our brain profoundly alters its behavior and purpose, dimming our consciousness. For a while, we become almost entirely paralyzed. We can’t even shiver. Our eyes, however, periodically dart about behind closed lids as if seeing, and the tiny muscles in our middle ear, even in silence, move as though hearing. We are sexually stimulated, men and women both, repeatedly. We sometimes believe we can fly. We approach the frontiers of death. We sleep.

Around 350 B.C., Aristotle wrote an essay, “On Sleep and Sleeplessness,” wondering just what we were doing and why. For the next 2,300 years no one had a good answer. In 1924 German psychiatrist Hans Berger invented the electroencephalograph, which records electrical activity in the brain, and the study of sleep shifted from philosophy to science. It’s only in the past few decades, though, as imaging machines have allowed ever deeper glimpses of the brain’s inner workings, that we’ve approached a convincing answer to Aristotle.

Everything we’ve learned about sleep has emphasized its importance to our mental and physical health. Our sleep-wake pattern is a central feature of human biology—an adaptation to life on a spinning planet, with its endless wheel of day and night. The 2017 Nobel Prize in medicine was awarded to three scientists who, in the 1980s and 1990s, identified the molecular clock inside our cells that aims to keep us in sync with the sun. When this circadian rhythm breaks down, recent research has shown, we are at increased risk for illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease, and dementia...
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